coming back alive
pic
head
870 B.C.
Assyrian King Assur-nasir-Pal's army used inflatable animal skins to cross a moat. Records of death from cold water immersion date to ancient times.
1757 A.D.
A Frenchman made a jacket out of cork, for emergencies.
1815 A.D.
Up until this time, the Royal Navy used impressments (kidnapping of sailors at sea to enlist in the army) to recruit members. For this reason, lifejackets, which could help the prisoners escape from the boats, were not encouraged.
1861 A.D.
Cork becomes the main ingredient in all lifejackets.
1869 A.D.
Kapok, a fibrous vegetable material, was first used in lifejackets. This was abandoned quickly because it lost its buoyancy when squeezed or sat upon.
1902 A.D.
Kapok, a fibrous vegetable material, was first used in lifejackets. This was abandoned quickly because it lost its buoyancy when squeezed or sat upon.
1914 A.D
Following the “Empress of Ireland” accident, Mr. Macdonald of Portland, Oregon demonstrated his waterproof rubber survival suit but no one paid attention to it.
1918 A.D.
Walter Fry developed a lifesaving suit, which was tested by the US Navy in January, but nothing came of it.
1929 A.D.
The investigation of the shortfalls of some lifejackets. The main shortfall was that the wearer was often left floating face down in the water.
1946 A.D.
German forces during World War 2 noted the loss of critical personnel in sudden cold water. They were the first to observe the phenomena “after drop”, the continual cooling of the body after rescue.
1960 A.D.
Self-righting lifejackets become a standard in the United States.

 

450 B.C.
Herodotus of Halicarnassus, the father of History, Greek researcher and storyteller, wrote about death from hypothermia. “Those who could not swim perished from that cause, others from the cold”.
1700 A.D.
Since ships were made of wood up until this point, sailors used pieces of wood to help them float.
1800 A.D.
Inuit understood the dangers of cold-water immersion and made “spring-pelts” of sealskin or seal gut stitched together to make a waterproof covering.
1851 A.D.
Captain John Ross Ward, British arctic explorer, developed the first life jacket, made out of cork, for the National Lifeboat Institution.
1852 A.D.
US Congress passed the first requirement that passenger steamboats on the nation's rivers carry a float or life preserver for every passenger.
1875 A.D.
Captain Boyton of the New Jersey Life Saving Service, tested a life preserving suit for inventor Clark S. Merriman when crossing the English Channel. The suit had paddles and a small sail but he did not succeed in the crossing.
1912 A.D.
The development of inflatable rings to keep the wearer’s head above water
1928 A.D.
The SOLAS (International Safety of Life at Sea) Committee used a mannequin to investigate the performance of a lifejacket and protective oilskins on turbulent seas.
1939 A.D.
The development of inflatable rings to keep the wearer’s head above water.
1942 A.D.
Frankenstein’s in the UK developed leather immersion suits for Hurricane pilots who were forced to ditch their planes near freezing water.
1952 A.D.
The US Coast Guard introduced their Personal Flotation Devices regulations for Types 1-5.
1973 A.D.
The US Coast Guard introduced their Personal Flotation Devices regulations for Types 1-5.
1985 A.D.
The US Coast Guard proposed adoption of extensive requirements for approving lifejackets and additional requirements concerning their carriage on recreational boats.