coming back alive
pic
head
For Kids
THIS PAGE IS FULL OF INFO THAT ANY KID WHO LOVES THE OUTDOORS NEEDS TO KNOW. READ ON SO YOU CAN FIND OUT HOW TO BE SAFE AND HAVE FUN WHEN YOU HEAD TO THE FOREST, THE BEACH OR JUST TO YOUR OWN BACKYARD
If You Go Into the Woods Today..

STAY PUT, STAY DRY - TIPS FOR AVOIDING GETTING LOST IN THE WOODS: 

children hiking
Never go off into the woods by yourself. Always bring a buddy and tell an adult where you are going.
  • If you're hiking, stay in a group or at least buddy-up.

  • Carry an emergency whistle.

  • Count the number of people you started the hike with and keep track of them.

  • Tell someone else where you are going and how long you'll be gone.

  • Bring emergency gear such as a blanket, raincoat or tarp.

STAY PUT, STAY DRY - SAFETY TIPS FOR WHEN YOU ARE LOST: 

  • Tell yourself that you are lost and STAY PUT!

  • Keep cold away. If you STAY DRY, you feel warmer.

  • Find a cozy waiting place, not a hiding place. Make a 'new friend' out of a forest tree or rock to keep you company while you STAY PUT.

  • Make noise - It's easier to find you if you're not polite and quiet.

  • Don't make fires.

  • Don't climb up on stuff.

  • Don't hide from rescuers. No one will be mad at you for getting lost.

  • Do not eat or drink anything you didn't bring with you.

  • When lost in the woods, many people will be looking for you and likely will know your name. Don't be afraid to talk to them.

  • Don't be afraid of animals, as there are not many animals out there that will hurt you.

  • Carry a blanket, rain gear, tarp or trash bag to stay warm and dry.

  • The most important tip is to stay put, stay dry.

Buying a Child's PFD

What do I look for when I buy a children's PFD?

  • Coast Guard approved label.
  • A snug fit. Check weight and size on the label and try the PFD on your child. Pick up your child by the shoulders of the PFD; the child’s chin and ears won’t slip through a proper fit.
  • Head support for younger children. A well designed PFD will support the child’s head when the child is in the water.
  • A strap between the legs for younger children. This is a good feature because it helps prevent the vest from coming off.
  • Comfort and appearance. This is especially important for teens, who are less likely to wear a PFD.

Key steps to using your PFD

  • Never alter a PFD. It could lose its effectiveness.

  • The best way to get your child to wear a PFD, is to wear one yourself!

  • Never use toys like plastic rings or water wings in place of a PFD.

  • Have your child practice wearing a lifejacket- this will help prevent panic and rolling over

Who's Watching the Kids?

If you're not within arms reach, you've gone too far. Toddlers two to four years of age have the second highest water-related death rate of any age group.

Most of these young children were not adequately supervised by an adult when they died. They fall into backyard pools, rivers, lakes and bathtubs, even if the lapse in supervision was only for an instant. 68% of young victims under five years of age were alone when they drowned and 64% were playing near water when they fell in.

IT TAKES LESS THAN A MINUTE FOR A CHILD TO DROWN. NEVER LEAVE YOUR CHILD UNATTENDED!

SAFETY TIPS:
child in pool
Keep your eyes on your children at all times when they are in or around water.
  • Teach your child to swim at an early age, so they will be comfortable in the water.
  • Don't ever leave them alone, even if just for a minute. In the time it takes to answer the phone, check on dinner, or go to the washroom, your child could sink silently to the bottom of your pool.

  • Don't rely on swimming lessons, or "floaties" to protect your child.

  • Keep rescue equipment (such as a shepherd's hook or life preserver) and a telephone by the pool.

  • Know CPR! This can mean the difference between life and death for your child.

diving
Don't dive in, unless you know how deep the water is.
Feeling Hot Hot Hot!

Sunburned Skin

When you get sunburned, you usually experience pain and a sensation of heat, symptoms that tend to become more severe several hours after sun exposure. You may also develop chills. Because the sun has dried your skin, it can become itchy and tight. Burned skin typically begins to peel about a week after the sunburn. Try not to scratch or peel off loose skin because the skin underneath the sunburn is vulnerable to infection.

The following tips will help you keep comfortable if you have a sunburn:

  • To help alleviate pain and heat, take a cool (not cold) bath, or gently apply cool, wet compresses to the skin.

  • Pure aloe vera gel (available in most pharmacies or taken directly from the within the leaves of the plant) is excellent for relieving sunburn pain and helping skin heal quicker.

  • You can also take a pain reliever such as acetaminophen (like Tylenol) or ibuprofen (like Motrin) and spray on over-the-counter "after-sun" pain relievers. (Do not give aspirin to children or teens.)

  • To rehydrate the skin and help reduce swelling, apply topical moisturizing cream;  1% hydrocortisone cream can be applied thinly to the most severely burned areas.

  • Do not use petroleum-based products (like Vaseline) because they prevent excess heat and sweat from escaping.

  • Avoid first-aid products that contain benzocaine, which may cause skin irritation or allergy.

  • If you have a sunburn, stay in the shade until it's healed. Any additional sun exposure will only increase the severity of the burn and increase pain.

If the sunburn is severe and blisters develop, call your doctor. Until you can see your child's doctor, tell your child not to scratch, pop, or squeeze the blisters, which can become easily infected and result in scarring.

sunburn
Which of these guys is going to be feeling the pain?

 

child
If you get separated from your group, find a cozy place out of the wind to wait. Sitting beside a tree or a rock is the best idea.
child in tree
Get outside, enjoy the sunshine and nature that is all around you, and above all, stay safe!
Kids and Lifejackets

What Is a Personal Flotation Device?

A personal flotation device is a Coast Guard approved life jacket that helps you float and stay warm in the water.

children

Why Should Your Wear a PFD?

Drowning is often silent, takes as little as five minutes and usually happens when an adult is nearby. No one can watch you every second.

 

When should you wear a PFD?

  • Between birth and five years old: on beaches, docks and in boats.

  • Between the ages of 6-11: on docks, boats, inner tubes and riverbanks.

  • Teens and adults: on boats or inner tubes.

children
Wearing your lifejacket means you won't have to worry about falling in the water. All you have to worry about is having fun!
Backyard Dangers

SWIMMING POOLS CAN BE A SERIOUS HAZARD FOR CURIOUS CHILDREN. REDUCE THE RISK OF YOUR CHILD FALLING IN BY CHILD-PROOFING YOUR YARD: 

pool fence

Don't leave toys or other objects that might attract a child near the pool. Make sure your yard has a self-locking gate. Ideally, it should be fenced on all 4 sides.

If there is access to the pool area from the house, make sure you have multiple barriers and locks in place that a youngster cannot open. Children are more skilled with their hands than you might think. Consider purchasing an audio pool.

Hey Kids: Swim Smart!

When you are swimming, keep these tips in mind:

  • Never swim during a storm or when there is lightning.

  • Never swim alone. Always use the buddy system.

  • Swim only in safe, guarded areas.

  • kids swim
    Always swim with a buddy and know your limits!
  • Know how deep the water is.

  • Don’t dive or jump into water that is not at least 12 feet deep.

  • Don’t run around a pool, push people in or dunk other swimmers.

  • Don’t chew gum or eat food while swimming, diving or playing in the water.

  • Take swimming lessons.

  • Be extra careful in the ocean and don’t run into the waves, which can knock you down.

  • Rivers are very dangerous for swimming. It is best to stay out of them.

Fun in the Sun: Feel the Burn

Even one or two blistering sunburns can significantly increase your risk of developing skin cancer, including melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer, later in life. Don’t think you can’t get burned. Even dark-skinned children can get sunburned. Anyone not practicing the following sun safety measures increases his or her risk of skin cancer.

children
Cover up if you're going to be in the sun for any amount of time. It takes only 20 minutes to suffer a severe burn.
  1. Limit outdoor activities between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when the sun's rays are strongest. Don't forget there is reflective light even in the shade.

  2. Babies under 6 months old should spend very little time in the sun. If they are out in the sun, they should wear protective clothing, including a hat with a brim that shades their face and sunglasses that filter harmful UV rays.

  3. Babies and children over 6 months should always wear a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. Sunscreen should be applied 30 minutes before children go outside and reapplied every two hours when they are in the sun or water, even if the label says the product is waterproof. Don't forget the nose, lips, ears and backs of hands and feet! Stick sunscreen products with paraffin are good for those areas, since they don't drip and sting young eyes.

  4. Kids should wear photoprotective clothing and hats. Just wearing a white t-shirt isn't good enough. A wet, light-colored shirt transmits almost as much light to a child as his or her bare skin! So wear dark colors with long sleeves and pants whenever possible. Some companies specialize in designing photoprotective clothing.

sunscreen
Apply sunscreen on all exposed skin before heading into the sun. It might be a bummer, but it beats being a tomato the next day.